Once you’ve made the commitment to make your show accessible, remember to let your audience know!

  • Let the Fringe Society know when registering your show so your show is listed on edfringe.com as accessible. We will also list your accessible performances on the Access Scottish Theatre website.
  • Include information about your accessible performances on all your marketing material. People who require accessible performances need plenty of time to work out what they are going to see, often because there is less choice available. Make it easy for them to find out about what you are offering.
  • Contact equalities@edfringe.com for assistance on finding relevant local organisations to contact with information about your accessible performances.
  • Include references to any signed performances on your standard marketing. Include it on posters and flyers rather than thinking of marketing your signed performance as being an entirely separate thing to marketing your show as a whole.
  • Putting on more than one signed performance can create further interest in the show, as many in the Deaf community rely on word of mouth when deciding what to see on the Fringe. More than one signed performance is cost effective and means there will be a higher probability of attendance from Deaf audience members.
  • The earlier you can confirm your show will feature sign language, the better. Important information to include in your marketing is the name of the signer or Deaf performer and where their location will be on the stage. Are they shadowing another performer? Is sign language embedded in the show or are they standing to the side of other performers (and if they are, where)?
  • If possible, make a short video flyer in sign language with a synopsis of the show for promotion online. Social media is a key resource for reaching out to the Deaf community. The Fringe Society can supply a list of groups who have requested to be sent information of this kind to be shared among their networks, and it can also be included on your show’s page on the Fringe website.
  • Details to include in a video include the name of the signer and their role within the production. It is also useful to include key information such as the sign names of characters. 
  • The Fringe Society will be making video flyers for all signed performances that have confirmed by May. Contact equalities@edfringe.com for more details.

Remember the importance of word of mouth, especially at the Fringe, so consider more than one performance! This is incredibly important for spreading information and creating interest among D/deaf audiences.

  • The earlier you can confirm your show will feature captioning, the better for everyone.  
  • Include references to any audio description on your standard marketing. Include it on posters and flyers rather than thinking of marketing your captioned performance as being an entirely separate thing to marketing your show as a whole. 
  • Important information to include in your marketing is the name of the captioner or if it is being produced in-house.
  • Provide information on how the captioning will be conducted. Will it be on an LED screen (and if so, where will the screen be?), via tablets or are you using another innovative method?
  • If the captioning is conducted via tablets, advertise whether they need to be reserved beforehand or not and where this can be done.
  • Include references to any audio description on your standard marketing, include it on posters and flyers rather than thinking of marketing your audio described performance as being an entirely separate thing to marketing your show as a whole.
  • The earlier you can confirm your show will feature audio description, the better for everyone. 
  • Important information when marketing your show is the name of the audio describer and the method of audio description you are using.
  • Produce an audio flyer (an MP3 audio recording) with a synopsis, character list, description of the visual aspects of the show and booking information. This can be included on your show listing on the Fringe website.
  • If producing an online video to advertise your show, include audio description. This can also be included on the listings page on the Fringe website.
  • Have a Word document available with show information (these can be downloaded and put through a screen reader).
  • Ask the Fringe Society for a list of groups to contact who may be interested in your show.

Remember the importance of word of mouth, especially at the Fringe, so consider more than one performance!

  • Include references to any touch tours on your standard marketing. Include it on posters and flyers rather than thinking of marketing your touch tour as being an entirely separate thing to marketing your show as a whole.
  • The earlier you can confirm you will provide a touch tour, the more beneficial this will be for the audience as it gives them time to plan and prepare.
  • As touch tours are often paired with audio described or relaxed performances, see further marketing advice in the audio description and relaxed performance guides and marketing sections.
  • Marketing a relaxed performance can have the added purpose of preparing the audience for your show and the environment they are going to enter. It is also necessary for those attending, even if they themselves do not require the accessibility of a relaxed performance, to ensure that they are respectful of people who do require it. 
  • Include references to any relaxed performances on your standard marketing. Include it on posters and flyers rather than thinking of marketing your relaxed performance as being an entirely separate thing to marketing your show as a whole.
  • On the Fringe website, your show listing will include a list of triggers and other factors audiences should be aware of contained in the performance. 
  • If possible, make a video trailer for your show. This could contain the same information as your show’s introduction and as the social story, feature cast members using Makaton and, if possible, provide a tour of the venue space. This could also be included on your show’s listings page on the Fringe website.
  • Alternatively, find out if the venue has a video or photographs detailing what the venue space looks like.
  • Use social media to the fullest when promoting your relaxed performance. Ask the Fringe Society to supply a list of groups who have requested to be sent information of this kind to be shared among their networks.
  • The Fringe Society provides sensory backpacks to autistic people, and others, who find the Fringe to be a stressful environment. These contain ear defenders, fidgets and other items intended to reduce stress and lessen the impact the busy atmosphere the Festival Fringe can have on the senses. This information could also be made available when promoting your show.